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Portable GIS accepted as OSGeo Community Project




Portable GIS, the tool that Astun use for delivering training courses, has now been accepted as an official OSGeo Community Project.

What’s Portable GIS?


Portable GIS is a suite of open source GIS tools that can be run from a USB stick, directly in windows, without the need for installation or booting to a different operating system. It includes a full PostgreSQL database server, QGIS, Mapserver, Geoserver, Python, and a whole series of other packages, all accessible from a lightweight control panel. Basically everything you need to run an open source GIS stack, but portable and ready-configured!

It was developed originally as a personal project in 2008, and has matured into a popular tool for situations such as training and disaster recovery.


It’s also very useful as a tool for demonstrating the open source stack without the need for installation, which can be helpful in places where software installation is controlled by central ICT.


What does Community Project acceptance mean?


Official OSGeo Community Projects must be licensed as open source, and must have a repository where people can download the source code, with clear guidelines for contributors.
Community Projects are listed on the OSGeo website, and are encouraged to move towards incubation as full OSGeo projects. There is also the opportunity to access a small amount of funding for further development or tools, so watch this space!

Great, where can I find out more?

Portable GIS has it’s own website at https://portablegis.xyz, where you can find links to the download site, code repository, and full documentation. Otherwise, look out for it in use at the next Astun Training course!

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